Tudor Place

25th Annual Garden Party Set for May 24, 2017

April 5, 2017

  • Celebrating a quarter-century tradition.

CONTACT

INVITATIONS

Development Director Mary Michael Wachur Invitations have been mailed,
202.580.7323 | mwachur@tudorplace.org please register online.
Communications Director Mandy Katz
202.580.7329 | mkatz@tudorplace.org

 Ticket Info

Washington, DC – Blair Bourne and Sassy Jacobs will chair the 25th Annual Spring Garden Party at Tudor Place, the 1816 National Historic Landmark estate in Washington’s Georgetown Historic District. The popular event is the museum’s most significant annual fundraiser, supporting education, operations, and preservation of the historic house and the 5½-acre landscape where the party takes place.

Co-Chairs Sassy Jacobs (top left) and Blair Bourne to honor Tim Matz (below).

Chairs Sassy Jacobs (top left) + Blair Bourne to honor Tim Matz.

Cousins, Co-Chairs Blair and Sassy previously served as members of the Garden Party Committee, and Sassy — in one of her first jobs — scheduled events and weddings here as a Tudor Place employee. Gala honoree Timothy B. Matz is a loyal and longtime friend and supporter of the museum. A partner in the law firm of Silver, Freedman, Taff & Tiernan, Tim served on the museum’s Board of Trustees from 2006-2014, serving two terms as board president. He also led the search committee that selected Mark Hudson to succeed retiring Executive Director Leslie Buhler in 2015.

More than 25,000 members of the public visited Tudor Place during its Bicentennial year, 2016. The site opened to the public as a museum in 1985 following nearly two centuries of ownership by a single family descended from Martha Washington.

Tours and education programs serve more than 3,000 school children each year from D.C. and nearby communities, including numerous Title I schools, and serve as a living classroom for all ages on history, the environment, art, and architecture.

Funds raised at the Garden Party support these programs, as well as award-winning conservation, archaeological research, and advanced horticultural practices in one of the District’s best preserved green spaces.

 

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