Tudor Place

READING ROOM:

Land & Business

Land for Sale - Ohio + Kanawha R map_lg
  • The Papers of Martha Washington at Tudor Place
    November 23, 2016
    As a granddaughter and namesake of Martha Washington, Tudor Place founder Martha Parke Custis Peter inherited several important pieces of her correspondence following the death of the first president. Since 2015, the University of Virginia has been annotating and publishing the Mrs. Washington’s letters as part of an ongoing partnership between The Washington Papers project (formerly ...
  • Many Admirers… But Still a Widow: Reflections on Britannia Peter Kennon’s Widowhood
    August 25, 2016
    Nora Pehrson explains the origins of her essay on Britannia, written while interning here during her senior at Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C. Nora now attends Colby College in Waterville, Maine. I was drawn to Britannia’s story because of an abiding interest in women’s history. I wanted to situate  Britannia in the broader context of her time. ...
  • Oakland: Far from the Madding Crowd
    April 2, 2016
    Though grand by city standards even when the Peters first purchased it in 1805, the original eight and a half acres of Tudor Place was by no means their largest property. Most affluent urban families of the time owned large farms, and the Peters were no exception. Among the lands Thomas Peter inherited from his father Robert was a tract in ...
  • Land for Sale: Inquire Within
    September 24, 2015
    · Land & Business · George Washington’s ties to the land — to Mount Vernon and his other farms and his extensive knowledge of Lord Fairfax’s vast Virginia properties — are widely known. But far less has been written about the details of his land speculation far to the west, in the Ohio River valley extending ...
  • Legal Trouble: Martha Washington’s Will and the Early U.S. Courts
    February 19, 2015
    · Georgetown and the Federal City · Court delays, punishing attorney fees, and prolonged disputes are nothing new in American law, a fact nowhere made clearer than in this account of legal proceedings following the 1802 death of Martha Washington, “The Court Will Come to Order: Dandridge vs. Executors of Martha Washington’s Will,” by Tudor Place ...
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